Food Safety Research Information Office
Title:Alternative Intervention and Control Strategies for Foodborne Pathogens in Poultry and Poultry Products
Objective:

Objective 1: Investigate the use of non-antibiotic compounds as potential intervention/control strategies to reduce the colonization of foodborne pathogens, especially Salmonella and Campylobacter, in poultry. Determine the impact of this intervention on the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Sub-objective 1A: Reduce the incidence of Campylobacter in poultry utilizing a motility enhanced probiotic. Sub-objective 1B: Reduce the incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in poultry utilizing caprylic acid. Sub-objective 1C: Reduce the incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in turkeys utilizing natural plant extracts trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, thymol, and proanthocyanidins. Sub-objective 1D: Reduce the incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter in turkeys utilizing combinations of caprylic acid and natural plant extracts trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, thymol, and proanthocyanidins.

Objective 2: Determine the role of stress-related factors in the emergence and persistence of foodborne pathogens in poultry from farm to processing, and develop non-antibiotic feed ingredients or other potential interventions for decreasing the impact of those risk factors on pathogen colonization and prevalence in turkeys. Sub-objective 2A: Determine effects of the host stress response on colonization sites and pathogenicity of Escherichia coli in genetic lines of Japanese quail, and determine if heat stress or line affects pathogen virulence and colonization of Salmonella. Sub-objective 2B: Determine effects of the host stress response and heat stress/E. coli challenge on colonization sites and pathogenicity of C. coli in genetic lines of Japanese quail, and determine if heat stress/E. coli challenge affects colonization patterns of Campylobacter. Sub-objective 2C: Determine effects of E. coli challenge and transport stress on colonization sites of C. coli in selected genetic lines of the turkey host. Sub-objective 2D: Develop nonspecific immunomodulators as alternative feed or water ingredients to improve the Japanese quail and turkey stress response, thus decreasing pathogen colonization of commercial turkeys.

More Info:
Approach:
The goal of this project is to develop novel, non-antibiotic intervention strategies to improve the safety of turkey products with a special emphasis on organic production. These strategies will target both Salmonella and Campylobacter and will include novel motility enhanced probiotics, caprylic acid, and plant-dervied essential oils to reduce colonization of these important foodborne pathogens. The project will also determine the role of production stressors on both host resistance and pathogen virulence and will explore novel plant-based feed ingredients that modulate stress effects on pathogen colonization and persistence.
Funding Source:United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service (ARS)
Type:Appropriated
Start Date:2011
End Date:2016
Project Number:6226-32000-011-00
Accession Number:421592
Institutions:USDA/ARS - Southern Plains Area
Investigators:Donoghue, Ann
Huff, Geraldine
Huff, William
Rath, Narayan
Project Reports:2013 Annual Report
2012 Annual Report
Published Journal
Articles USDA
ARS (NP 108):
Effect of different concentrations of acetic, citric, and propionic acid dipping solutions on bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin
Menconi A, Shivaramaiah C, Huff GR, Prado O, Morales E, Pumford N, Morgan M, Wolfenden AD.
Poult Sci. 2013 Aug;92(8):2216-20.
Targeting motility properties of bacteria in the development of probiotic cultures against Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens
Aguiar VF, Donoghue AM, Arsi K, Reyes-Herrera I, Metcalf JH, de los Santos FS, Blore PJ, Donoghue DJ.
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2013 May;10(5):435-41.
The effects of yeast feed supplementation on turkey performance and pathogen colonization in a transport stress/Escherichia coli challenge
Huff GR, Huff WE, Jalukar S, Oppy J, Rath NC, Packialakshmi B.
Poult Sci. 2013 Mar;92(3):655-62.
Response of restraint stress-selected lines of Japanese quail to heat stress and Escherichia coli challenge
Huff GR, Huff WE, Wesley IV, Anthony NB, Satterlee DG.
Poult Sci. 2013 Mar;92(3):603-11.
Use of plant-derived antimicrobials for improving the safety of poultry products
Venkitanarayanan K, Kollanoor-Johny A, Darre MJ, Donoghue AM, Donoghue DJ.
Poult Sci. 2013 Feb;92(2):493-501.
Comparison of hematologic and serologic profiles of broiler birds with normal (NORM) and severe (SEV) degrees of white striping in breast fillets
Kuttappan VA, Huff GR, Huff WE, Hargis BM, Apple JK, Coon CN, Owens CM.
Poult Sci. 2013 Feb;92(2):339-45.
Palatability of tannin-rich sericea lespedeza fed to broilers
Moyle JR, Burkeć JM, Fanatico A, Mosjidis JA, Spencer T, Arsi K, Reyes-Herrera I, Woo-Ming A, Donoghue DJ, Donoghue AM.
J Appl Poult Res. 2012 Dec;21(4):891-6.
Effects of trans-cinnamaldehyde on Campylobacter and sperm viability in chicken semen after in vitro storage
Liu GQ, Donoghue AM, Moyle JR, Reyes-Herrera I, Blore PJ, Bramwell RK, Yoho DE, Venkitanarayanan K, Donoghue DJ.
Int J Poult Sci. 2012 Nov;11(8):536-40.
The probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 enhances early gastrointestinal maturation in young turkey poults
Moyle JR, Solis F, Huff GR, Huff WE, Rath NC, Farnell M, Fanatico AC, Ricke SC, Enders C, Sonnenborn U, Donoghue DJ, Donoghue AM.
Int J Poult Sci. 2012 Jul;11(7):445-52.
Reduction of Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis colonization in 20-day-old broiler chickens by the plant-derived compounds trans-cinnamaldehyde and eugenol
Kollanoor-Johny A, Mattson T, Baskaran SA, Amalaradjou MA, Babapoor S, March B, Valipe S, Darre M, Hoagland T, Schreiber D, Khan MI, Donoghue A, Donoghue D, Venkitanarayanan K.
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2012 Apr;78(8):2981-7.
In vitro selection of enteric microflora for potential use as a competitive exclusion culture against Campylobacter in poultry
Bhaskaran HP, Donoghue AM, Arsi K, Wooming A, Reyes-Herrera I, Bielke LR, Tellez G, Byrd JA, Blore PJ, Hargis BM, Donoghue DJ.
Int J Poult Sci. 2011 Dec;10(12):940-5.
Non-journal publications:
Comparison of hematologic and serologic profiles of broiler birds with normal and severe degrees of white striping in breast fillets - (Abstract Only)
Kuttappan, V.A., Huff, G.R., Huff, W.E., Hargis, B.M., Apple, J.K., Coon, C.N., Owens, C.M. 2012. Comparison of hematologic and serologic profiles of broiler birds with normal and severe degrees of white striping in breast fillets [abstract]. Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract. 91:(Suppl 1):148.
Developing natural solutions to reducing food safety pathogens in organically raised poultry - (Abstract Only)
Accepted Publication (23-Jan-12)
Development of an online training course on sustainable livestock production (poultry, sheep and goat), agroforestry and integrated operations for beginning farmers - (Abstract Only)
Reyes-Herrera, I., Donoghue, D.J., Goeringer, P., Goodwin, H.L., Fanatico, A.C., Donoghue, A.M., Moyle, J.R., Burke, J.M., Burner, D.M., Raper, R., Spencer, T., Hale, M. 2012. Development of an online training course on sustainable livestock production (poultry, sheep and goat), agroforestry and integrated operations for beginning farmers [abstract]. Southern Sustainable Agricultural Workers Group Conference, January 18-21, 2012, Little Rock, AR.
Food Safety Categories:Food and Feed Composition and Characteristics
On-Farm Food Safety
Pathogen Biology
Farm-to-Table categories:On-farm food production
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